How can the electorate influence the US president and UK prime minister?

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P‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍lease use at lest 6 quotes from the book only don’t get it from anywhere ales . Do not use a quotes that the book has quote it from other books or sources. Use Chapter 13,14,15 book block 2 that I have attached. Make it at least 6 paragraphs make suer about word count which is 2000 word no more or lase in part one and part 2 – 120 words. Use Harvard referencing. There are two parts to this TMA. You need to complete both. On the following pages you will find guidance on how to complete each of the different parts of this assignment. Part 1: Essay (90% of the mark for this assignment) How can the electorate influence the US president and UK prime minister? Word limit: 2000 words Part 2: Short statement (10% of the mark for this assignment) Having compared an aspect of the political systems of the UK and the US, please write a short statement setting out what you have found to be the advantages and disadvantages of adopting a comparative approach to the study of political science. Word limit: 120 words In the following pages, you will find: • learning outcomes addressed by this assignment • student notes for each part of this assignment • a checklist to ensure you have done everything required for this assignment. Learning outcomes This TMA allows you to demonstrate: • knowledge of two different political systems • knowledge of the key institutions, the executive, the legislature and the judiciary, that provide for the government of a liberal democracy • an understanding that different arrangements of the key political institutions leads to different outcomes • an appreciation of the role played by political leaders in a liberal democracy and their relationship to the state, its citizens, public opinion and key economic and social interest groups and movements • knowledge and understanding of a key political science formal model, exploring and explaining the key similarities and differences of the two liberal democracies studied in the module • an understanding of how case studies can be used in political research, and how comparative politics compares and contrasts different case studies. Student notes Part 1 Approach This question is asking you to explore the different types of chief executives found in parliamentary and presidential systems – the UK prime minister and the US president – as they operate within the political systems of the UK and the US. You are expected to focus upon the different and distinctive interrelationship of the prime minister and president with their respective electorates, but you can also use their interaction with their constitutional arrangements and legislatures to reflect more broadly upon the different political systems of the UK and the US. Checks and balances operate differently in the UK and US political systems, and the president and prime minister have very different opportunities to exert power as a result. This question requires you to explore that by comparing the ways in which the president and the prime minister are elected, re-elected and thereafter held accountable by the public in their political systems and by their legislatures. You will need to first consider how, in terms of election, the president and the prime minister become the president and the prime minister. You can then thereafter explore the differences between presidential and parliamentary systems in terms of the power each chief executive has and how checks and balances are expected to work within each political system. You must account for the respective strengths and weaknesses of the president and prime minister under the constitutional arrangements their respective political systems impose. You need to explore the checks and balances the electorate can exert upon a president and a prime minister and examine how these relate to the other checks and balances enacted by other political institutions. You are encouraged to focus on how, why and when the electorate can either help or hinder, enable or disable, empower or disempower their respective chief executive and to explore how other institutions, especially presidential and parliamentary legislatures, play their part in facilitating this. Illustrate your answer with examples from both the UK and the US political systems. Key sources You will find it useful to draw upon material from across Block 4. Key materials for this task are: • Week 17: Compares the form and function/powers and the purposes of both the UK prime minister and the US president and explores the role played by the UK parliament and the US congress. Pay particular attention to Chapter 14 of the module book, ‘Institutional differences between UK prime ministers and US presidents’ (Section 6, Week 17), ‘Political leaders in liberal democracies’ (Section 1, Week 17), and the audio ‘How the UK prime minister and the US president differ’ (Week 17, Section 5). • Week 16, Section 5, ‘Lijphart’s model of majoritarian and consensus democracies’ (and revisited in Week 19, Section 10 ‘Conclusion of Block 4’, which provides an overview of the very different political systems of the UK and the US, including their constitutional arrangements, the distinctive roles played by prime minister and president, and the roles played by parliament and congress). • Chapter 13 of the module book, ‘How the UK and the US political systems differ’. This chapter sets out some key distinctions, such as the means of electing the president and prime minister (and removing them from office), the nature of the respective constitutions, and the different organisational structures found in federal and unitary states, presidential and parliamentary systems. It also includes some key ideas about how these institutional arrangements shape political outcomes. • Week 18, Week 19 and Chapter 15 of the module book, ‘Elections and parties in the UK and the US’, explore the wider context that prime minister‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍s and presidents operate in and the ways in which electoral opinion is expressed and enacted. Writing a good answer To be successful on this part of the TMA you should: • show how the prime minister and the president operate within both the US and UK political systems • explain and account for the election and removal of the president and prime minister, their responsiveness to public opinion, and factor in the very different relationships the prime minister and the president have with parliament and congress. Be very aware that the relationship between the electorate and the president and prime minister is enacted within – and structured by – by each respective political system as expressed in key institutional forms. The political system matters, and must be taken into account. • demonstrate and account for the relative strengths and weaknesses of the prime minister and president as they operate within their political systems. Part 2 Approach This reflective exercise asks you to think about the advantages and disadvantages of adopting a comparative approach to political science; in this case, the political systems of the UK and the US. You could identify what the act of comparing political systems enables you to achieve, which simply concentrating on one political system would not allow. You might also consider whether, by comparing two countries, you are comparing like with like. Key sources There are no specific recommended sources for this task as it is a reflective activity relating to your experience of studying the block as a whole. You are not expected to engage academically with sources to write this statement. Writing a good answer To be successful on this part of the TMA you should: • Outline both advantages and disadvantages of adopting a comparative approach • Provide specific examples to support your points. References and word count Remember to include a word count after each part of your answer and a list of all the references you cite for the TMA as a whole. Present the sources as though in a reference list, following the ‘Cite Them Right’ version of the Harvard referencing system used by The Open University. You can find advice on the Referencing and plagiarism page of the OU Library website. This page provides access to: 1. the Cite Them Right website: a practical guide to referencing commonly used by UK universities 2. a downloadable Quick guide to Harvard referencing (Cite Them Right), which includes advice on referencing module material. Your list of references at the end of your TMA, as well as your title, are not included in the word count. Plagiarism warning If you submit an assignment that contains work that is not your own, without indicating this to your reader (that is, without acknowledging your sources including module books and internet sources), you are committing plagiarism. It is an offence to plagiarise. Software that detects plagiarism is applied to student assignments and may result in an investigation by Academic Conduct Officers. Please make sure you note the OU’s plagiarism policy statement. Checklist Have I: Yes No, where can I look for guidance? made sure I understand the question? Look at Getting started in ‘Social Sciences Assessment Information’. See also Understanding the question in ‘Skills for OU Study’ read all of the guidance notes for this assignment? Carefully read through the student notes that accompany your assignment to check that you have followed all the advice and instructions. actively studied the relevant module material and anything else to which I’ve been directed? See the booklets Reading and Taking Notes and Thinking Critically. reflected on my learning, including feedback received on earlier assignments, in order to improve my skills? See Section 2, ‘Active learning’ and Section 4, ‘Being reflective’ of the booklet Developing Effective Study Strategies. See also Learning from feedback in ‘Skills for OU Study’ thought about how best to structure my answer, and about style and language? Further advice on structuring answers is available in the relevant sections in ‘Social Sciences Assessment Information’. See, for example, Skill: Essay writing. For questions relating to style and language, see the section Presentation and language in ‘Social Sciences Assessment Information’. See also Developing academic English and Writing for university in ‘Skills for OU Study’; and section 7 ‘Choosing a writing style’ and section 8 ‘Improving your written English’ of the booklet Preparing Assignments. written in my own words? Guidance on writing in your own words is available in the sections on Skill: Understanding plagiarism and Skill: Writing in your own words in ‘Social Sciences Assessment Information’. where necessary, used evidence to back my arguments, and referenced correctly? Advice on using evidence to support your arguments is available in the section on Selecting your examples in ‘Social Sciences Assessment Information’. See also Gathering your materials in ‘Skills for OU Study’. Guidance on referencing is available in the section on Referencing in ‘Social Sciences Assessment Information’. checked my word count? The guidance notes tell you the word limit for each part of the TMA. An answer that is shorter than the word length by more than 10% is likely to be too short to have fully answered the question. An answer that exceeds the word limit by more than 10% may be penalised. For further information see the section on Word length in ‘Social Sciences Assessment Information’. written the word count at the end of each part of my TMA? Check the word count and write that figure clearly at the end of each part of the assignment. set out my assignment properly? See Section , ‘Conventions for presenting work’ in your module’s Assessment Guidance, which you will find under Assessment on the modu‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‌‌‍‍‍‌‍‍‍‍‌‍‍le website. completed each part of the TMA? Read through these assignment notes carefully to check that you have completed all the necessary tasks.

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